for the mothers

 first-ever Run Across Congo, supporting and celebrating the resurgence of the Kivu Region through empowering women and mothers in farming communities.  "The Congo means so much to me because my son is Congolese. Kai came into our family through adoption two years ago. (I'm an advocate for family preservation and adoption should always be the last resort). What a better way to fight for family preservation then through advocating and raising funds and awareness for women to have sustainable incomes?" Britt says.  Britt will traverse the Great Lakes region of Africa for 300km (185 miles!) and include stops in farming communities with organizing partners, On The Ground and Twin, which have existing relationships with coffee cooperatives and local officials.  The Run Across Congo is a 7-marathon, 7-day expedition along the shores of Lake Kivu in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo will raise awareness and funds for the inspiring female coffee farmers, farming families, and cooperatives working toward gender equality in the region.

стихи про данила смешные “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.”

As we celebrate Mother’s Day, I think about the wisdom nestled into this African proverb.

I look at this photo of women living across the globe who fight cultural oppression and opposition to farm coffee beans to provide for themselves and their family, and I remember. I remember that we were never made to do it alone.

http://rpurf.ru/vyazaniy-sviter-s-otkritoy-spinoy-shema-vyazaniya.html вязаный свитер с открытой спиной схема вязания Jesus said the greatest commandment is this: To love God, and to love our neighbors.

Love. God. Others.

метод фрейда 2 сериал This seemingly simple statement changes everything.

Our hearts. Our families. Our neighborhoods. Our world.

I think about the mothers around the world, doing the holy work of parenting and emotionally and physically providing for their families.

http://svetlana-shebeko.ru/zdl/lbkgf/ketorol-instruktsiya-primeneniyu.html кеторол инструкция применению About the universal truths of motherhood, as well as the experiences and struggles that I honestly can’t begin to fathom

 first-ever Run Across Congo, supporting and celebrating the resurgence of the Kivu Region through empowering women and mothers in farming communities.  "The Congo means so much to me because my son is Congolese. Kai came into our family through adoption two years ago. (I'm an advocate for family preservation and adoption should always be the last resort). What a better way to fight for family preservation then through advocating and raising funds and awareness for women to have sustainable incomes?" Britt says.  Britt will traverse the Great Lakes region of Africa for 300km (185 miles!) and include stops in farming communities with organizing partners, On The Ground and Twin, which have existing relationships with coffee cooperatives and local officials.  The Run Across Congo is a 7-marathon, 7-day expedition along the shores of Lake Kivu in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo will raise awareness and funds for the inspiring female coffee farmers, farming families, and cooperatives working toward gender equality in the region.

http://auxilium79.ru/wp-includes/theme-compat/trogatelniy-stih-pape-ot-dochki.html трогательный стих папе от дочки Later this month, my friend Britt, a fellow busy mama of little ones, is joining a team of runners to participate in the first-ever Run Across Congo, supporting, celebrating, and empowering women and mothers in farming communities.

“The Congo means so much to me because my son is Congolese. Kai came into our family through adoption two years ago. (I’m an advocate for family preservation and adoption should always be the last resort). What a better way to fight for family preservation then through advocating and raising funds and awareness for women to have sustainable incomes?” Britt says. “I want to do something help the people of Congo develop sustainable jobs and make positive changes in their communities so families can stay together. This also helps children stay with their families, which creates less orphans.”

I first connected with Britt because her son Kai has sickle cell anemia — just like our son Joseph. Her beautiful family (Surfers! Can you tell?) also opens their home through foster care. They’re truly living out the Kingdom of God, and it’s beautiful.

“We are running for women in the Congo — mothers and widows — who are all raising families and hoping for a bright future through a sustainable job such as coffee farming, ” Britt says.

 first-ever Run Across Congo, supporting and celebrating the resurgence of the Kivu Region through empowering women and mothers in farming communities.  "The Congo means so much to me because my son is Congolese. Kai came into our family through adoption two years ago. (I'm an advocate for family preservation and adoption should always be the last resort). What a better way to fight for family preservation then through advocating and raising funds and awareness for women to have sustainable incomes?" Britt says.  Britt will traverse the Great Lakes region of Africa for 300km (185 miles!) and include stops in farming communities with organizing partners, On The Ground and Twin, which have existing relationships with coffee cooperatives and local officials.  The Run Across Congo is a 7-marathon, 7-day expedition along the shores of Lake Kivu in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo will raise awareness and funds for the inspiring female coffee farmers, farming families, and cooperatives working toward gender equality in the region.

образец резюме старшего продавца консультанта The Run Across Congo, a 7-marathon, 7-day expedition, will raise awareness and funds for the inspiring female coffee farmers, farming families, and cooperatives working toward gender equality in the region. Britt is running the Great Lakes region of Africa for 185 miles, visiting villages and farming communities with organizing partners, On The Ground and Twin, which have existing relationships with coffee cooperatives and local officials.

“Running is a great way to advocate for any cause — it gets your attention. I’m running this distance because the people of DRCongo mean so much to me. I’m willing to do whatever it takes to raise awareness and funds for these women farmers to start up a sustainable business for themselves and for their families,” Britt says. “DRCongo is a war-torn country and is one of the most dangerous places in the world to be a woman. A lot of these women are raising children alone. With a sustainable business such as coffee farming, they can feed their families, send their children to school, and pay for medical care.”

http://versall-spb.ru/harakteristika-sna-oblomova.html характеристика сна обломова Awareness and funds raised from Run Across Congo will have several long-term impacts, including gender equality and women’s empowerment programs, creating access to knowledge, land and income beyond coffee. Funds will be used to empower and educate female farmers to run their own lives and businesses and create a brighter future for coffee communities affected by civil war in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo.

 first-ever Run Across Congo, supporting and celebrating the resurgence of the Kivu Region through empowering women and mothers in farming communities.  "The Congo means so much to me because my son is Congolese. Kai came into our family through adoption two years ago. (I'm an advocate for family preservation and adoption should always be the last resort). What a better way to fight for family preservation then through advocating and raising funds and awareness for women to have sustainable incomes?" Britt says.  Britt will traverse the Great Lakes region of Africa for 300km (185 miles!) and include stops in farming communities with organizing partners, On The Ground and Twin, which have existing relationships with coffee cooperatives and local officials.  The Run Across Congo is a 7-marathon, 7-day expedition along the shores of Lake Kivu in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo will raise awareness and funds for the inspiring female coffee farmers, farming families, and cooperatives working toward gender equality in the region.

ацикловир сандоз таблетки инструкция по применению Funds will go three places:

маршрут 49 чебоксары For Mother’s Day, we have a chance to enter into this opportunity to provide mercy, compassion, and empowerment to mothers and families around the world. It’s a privilege and honor and joy to loving one another, and this is an incredible opportunity to love in a very tangible way.

Please consider joining me to support Run Across Congo, and pray for Britt, and all the women she is running for.

“The Congo became part of our family forever,” Britt says. “I’m running for family.”

 first-ever Run Across Congo, supporting and celebrating the resurgence of the Kivu Region through empowering women and mothers in farming communities.  "The Congo means so much to me because my son is Congolese. Kai came into our family through adoption two years ago. (I'm an advocate for family preservation and adoption should always be the last resort). What a better way to fight for family preservation then through advocating and raising funds and awareness for women to have sustainable incomes?" Britt says.  Britt will traverse the Great Lakes region of Africa for 300km (185 miles!) and include stops in farming communities with organizing partners, On The Ground and Twin, which have existing relationships with coffee cooperatives and local officials.  The Run Across Congo is a 7-marathon, 7-day expedition along the shores of Lake Kivu in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo will raise awareness and funds for the inspiring female coffee farmers, farming families, and cooperatives working toward gender equality in the region.

valentine’s day gift guide for ladies

TOMS just launched their Surprise Sale, and I’m swooning over the (majorly discounted) items from TOMS and their ethical marketplace partners (including my favorite brands like Krochet Kids Intl., Noonday, and Giving Keys).

The sale, which features much more than shoes, provides deep discounts starting at 40% off. And…there’s free shipping on $25+! I’m not going to lie, I’ve totally been adding to my cart throughout the day. (But, shop quickly! The sale ends Jan. 19.)

Tomorrow, I’ll share my picks for kids. (These are great to stock up on for Easter, too!)

Since it’s only ONE MONTH until Valentine’s Day — here’s my:

http://chadin.info/doki/sitemap75.html расписание автобусов казань магнитогорск Valentine’s Day Gift Guide: Top 7 Valentine’s Day Picks for Her

общие правила предупреждающие пищевые инфекционные заболевания Pick #1: Chestnut Suede Women’s Desert Wedges (TOMS)

женская эстафета 15 февраля результат Pick #2: Raw Wood Coasters (Rose & Fitzgerald)

 

http://blog.buh-kons.ru/libraries/vendor/likvidatsiya-obshestvennoy-organizatsii-poshagovaya-instruktsiya.html ликвидация общественной организации пошаговая инструкция Pick #3: Bukenya Fringe Necklace (Noonday)

http://symona.ru/symona/html/vlagalishe-vid-szadi.html влагалище вид сзади Pick #3: Ivory Metallic Burlap Women’s Classics

зачем нужна блок схема алгоритма Pick #5: Women’s Dress (Della)

альфа банк бланк Pick #6: Marco Bordeaux Crystal Shades (TOMS)

http://prosni.ru/wp-includes/widgets/dubleri-pozhelaniya-sinu.html дублёры пожелания сыну Pick #7: Goldenrod Elliott Fingerless Gloves (Krochet Kids Intl.)

TOMS Surprise Sale

 

Disclosure: Affiliate links used when applicable.

the kimball family: from zero to three

National Adoption Month // International and Domestic Adoption // A Real Family's Adoption Story // Many Sparrows Blog

можно ли пить цикорий What does your family look like right now?

My family consists of my husband Derek, who is a high school math teacher, Viola who is 6, Gideon who will be 5 in December and Charlotte who is 4 months old. As for me, I stay at home, I am an ambassador for Noonday Collection and a Mary Kay consultant.

где живут вампиры в россии What brought you to international adoption?

Derek and I had been trying to get pregnant for a little under a year. Even though I know that is not a long time compared to how long many couples try, I knew that I was ready to be a mom and didn’t want to wait. We had discussed fertility treatments for less than 10 minutes and came to the conclusion that our time, energy and money would be better spent pursuing children who otherwise might not have a forever family. We looked into domestic adoption and as we were about to sign on with an agency, Derek and I both felt like we weren’t making the right decision.

I remember being very confused, as I thought adoption was what God wanted from us and then we were feeling like it wasn’t. Long story short, we researched local adoption agencies that work internationally. Within 18 hours of talking with the agency we chose, we were provided our first two referrals from Uganda. Fast forward about 10 months, we had lost three referrals and finally had a travel date to go to Uganda to meet Viola and Gideon.

National Adoption Month // International and Domestic Adoption // A Real Family's Adoption Story // Many Sparrows Blog

National Adoption Month // International and Domestic Adoption // A Real Family's Adoption Story // Many Sparrows Blog

развитие и размножение растений презентация 3 класс At what age did you meet your little ones? 

When we met Viola, she was 4 years old. She was a terrified little girl who had not seen a lot of white people before in her life. We were supposed to take her that day, but because she was so scared of us, clinging to the pole in the middle of her hut, we decided it would be a better idea to come back and visit a few more times before actually taking her with us. We did not want her to be traumatized from her coming with us. That was one of the best decisions we ever made. After visiting a couple times, we went again, but this time we knew we were going to bring her with us. We got to her home, she was given a bath and a new dress, and her grandmother leaned down and whispered something in her ear. She then quietly walked over to me and let me hold her hand. The Lord was so present that day, she came with us with no fight or tears.

Gideon was 2 ½ when we met him. He was a quiet yet cuddly boy from the beginning. He came with us right away, with no fuss. We took him to eat, where he had his first bite of meat. He ate his lunch and most of Derek’s lunch, too.

http://musclegainingsecretsreviews.com/meta/vishivka-krestom-vetka-sakuri-shema.html вышивка крестом ветка сакуры схема How did you foster attachment with them?

Making sure adopted children build attachment can be challenging, but is so important. While in country, we all slept in the same bed, held them when they wanted to be held, bathed them, fed them, met all of their needs. It did not take them long to understand that we were going to be there for them. Derek and I feel very blessed by how quickly they attached to us.

National Adoption Month // International and Domestic Adoption // A Real Family's Adoption Story // Many Sparrows Blog

http://buxor.ru/libraries/vendor/opredelenno-lichnie-predlozheniya-tablitsa.html определенно личные предложения таблица What was it like jumping into motherhood with two children?

There were many challenges that came with jumping into motherhood with two children. Most of the challenges came with Derek and I as a couple and as parents. Generally, when people become parents, they start with a newborn(s) and have time to ease into their parenting techniques. So there were times when we might have disagreed on how to deal with a certain behavior, but didn’t have ample time to discuss the issue and how we wanted to handle it. When you start with an infant, you ease into different behaviors such as touching things you aren’t supposed to, putting things into your mouth, etc. With toddlers, who don’t know a lot of English, it was very challenging learning and adapting to proper discipline techniques that Derek and I both agreed on.

где находится ижевск на карте россии What types of training or books were helpful for you?

Derek and I took a class on attachment in children who have been through some sort of trauma. I credit this course for providing the resources we needed to properly attach to the children.

How can a friend of someone who is adopting be helpful? What was most encouraging or helpful for you?

I think everyone is different in what they need and what is helpful when going through a stressful time. There is a lot of waiting and paperwork and more waiting, and then some more waiting after that. It can be a very stressful time for people going through this process. Our hearts were aching for our children and the waiting is terribly unpleasant. I always appreciated the friends who let me talk their ears off about my worry and stress.

National Adoption Month // International and Domestic Adoption // A Real Family's Adoption Story // Many Sparrows Blog

How do you plan to preserve birth culture?

I am always on the lookout for Africa-related activities, books, food, etc. A year ago, my dad and stepmom’s church hosted a Uganda Children’s choir for a meal and a performance. We took Viola and Gideon and they ate a meal with the Ugandan children, who got a kick out the words that Viola and Gideon still remembered vs. the words they completely forgotten. I could tell that they really cherished that event. My dad occasionally makes some Ugandan staples for meals when we visit. But most importantly, we talk about Uganda whenever the kids want to. We watch videos from when we were staying in Uganda and we are constantly telling them about the love that their biological family has for them. Some day we would love to be able to take them back to see where they were born.

How do you navigate being a transracial family?

We definitely get looks, most being looks that say Aw, what a sweet family or Those are some cute kids, but occasionally we get looks that are a little more curious in nature. In the two years we have been home, I have probably had about 15 people come up to me and give me hair care tips. There are definitely days where it is very obvious that this clueless, white mama is trying to care for my beautiful black daughter’s hair. I will say that the blog Chocolate Hair, Vanilla Care has revolutionized my life and has taught me how to care for the kid’s hair.

What brought you to domestic adoption?

Derek and I were taking the classes necessary to get our foster license. While in the class, we were approached by someone at church about a birth mom that they knew. This woman had chosen adoption for a baby the year before and had just found out she was pregnant again. She had made the brave decision to choose adoption for this baby, too. After some careful consideration, we decided that this baby was going to be a Kimball. The birth mom allowed me to be at all the appointments starting at 20 weeks and then graciously gave my mother and I the opportunity to be in the delivery room.

National Adoption Month // International and Domestic Adoption // A Real Family's Adoption Story // Many Sparrows Blog

How has adding to your family domestically been different from international adoption?

Our situation with the domestic adoption was pretty rare. We did everything privately with one lawyer, so there wasn’t much paperwork compared to if you were to use an agency. The biggest difference was the relationship I was able to build with Charlotte’s birth mother. I was never able to foster a relationship with Viola and Gideon’s mothers and I really value the time I was able to spend with Charlotte’s biological mother.

How did Gideon + Viola adjust to adding a little one?

They did great! There were and still are some bumps in the road where Gideon feels left out or Viola feels like she can appropriately meet all of Charlotte’s needs on her own. But they truly love Charlotte and she lights up around them as well.

National Adoption Month // International and Domestic Adoption // A Real Family's Adoption Story // Many Sparrows Blog
How has faith played a role in the way you’ve built your family?

The Bible is very clear about how God feels about adoption. It’s not just something to skim over. God literally calls us to care for the widow and orphan. Because of this, Derek and I are committed to always being open for what God has planned for our family. We are finishing our foster license because we want to be available if there are vulnerable children that God has intended for our family. Our faith is the reason we do what we do and our faith is the reason our family looks the way it does.

What do you want others to know about adoption?

Adoption is scary, full of waiting, full of unknown, costly, and trying. Adoption is absolutely, 100% worth every stress, worry, and penny. Adoption is a beautiful way to build or add on to a family.

Everyone has a different story and perspective on adoption, and this is Kristen’s. Kristen’s guest post is part of National Adoption Month. Earlier this week, my friend January, who was adopted as a toddler from the Philippines, shared her perspective of being an adult adoptee. Later this week, my friend Zach will be sharing his experience of being domestically adopted and his journey to meet his birth parents. You can read my friend Kaia’s post about adoption through foster care here. For words from an adoption family therapist, check out Rachel’s moving guest post. This week, I’ll be closing up National Adoption Month with a giveaway of Mary Ostyn’s “Forever Mom” (multiple copies!) and Sara Hagerty’s “Every Bitter Thing is Sweet.”

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

go to ghana! (here’s how)

the move project kickstarter

A few years ago, our friends started an organization called The Move Project.

It exists to give clean water, shelter, and freedom to those without. They just installed a well in Tsipasi, Ghana (West Africa). The goal, beyond providing clean water, is to have an entry point for sustainable, holistic poverty alleviation for the community. The clean water well is their first step to joining hands with a community and helping them break the cycle of poverty.

The Move Project believes in the power of story. And so do I.

By telling a beautiful story, we can inspire people to make a difference.

Here’s where you come in.

The Move Project is raising $50,000 in 30 days to film a documentary that will focus on the joy and freedom that comes along with clean water. It’ll feature their work in Tsipasi and the Greater Accra region, and help them tell the story of just how much clean water means in breaking the cycle of poverty.

They need our help! The money will send a team to Ghana, buy a few pieces of equipment, and produce the film. They’re partnering with One:One Creatives (who took our family photos when Joseph first came home and they’re…talented.) to film and produce the documentary. You can learn more about the Kickstarter campaign here.

Why Kickstarter? By doing this fundraiser to fund the film, 100% of funds received toward clean water projects continue to go directly to the project. This model has allowed The Move Project to fund two wells with almost no overhead cost.

The team also believes they’ll be able to leverage the film to raise larger sums of funds for clean water, and the investment into the film will mean more villages (and regions!) get access to clean water and sanitation education.

If you pledge today, you don’t get charged until July 22nd, and that’s only if they’re fully funded. You can also change your pledge at any point during the campaign.

So, what does a documentary really have to do with coming alongside this community in Ghana?

Here’s what they have to say:We don’t want to just take your money and help you feel good about yourself for a moment. We also don’t want to contribute to the Western savior complex where rich people from America swoop in with cash and think material goods or possessions end poverty. We want to, together, tell a story of hope, inspiration, and how we can join hands with our neighbors across the globe to create new realities.

We’d be honored if you’d help us tell this story.

Clean water means kids are in school, which means kids are less likely to be vulnerable to trafficking (in Ghana, that primarily means being sold on to a fishing boat on the Volta River). Holistic, sustainable poverty alleviation, specifically in Ghana, starts with access to clean water.

We have launched the project on KickStarter, and it’s an audacious goal. $50,000 is our number.”

the move project fundraiser

So, to recap: The Move Project is raising money to film a documentary so they can leverage the film in the future to raise larger amounts of money for clean water projects. The film will give access to groups, organizations, and larger scale fundraising that will ultimately result in more people having access to clean water. They started with one village and their plans are to sink our roots deep in Tsiapsi, where the documentary will be filmed.

They have 30 days (deadline is July 22nd) to raise the $50,000 or they don’t get a penny.

Can we join them in this story?

love to burkina: meet valerie

envision mission trip to burkina faso west africa

Meet Zach + Valerie Metz. Aren’t they just the cutest? They also have big hearts. I’m so thankful that our paths have crossed in this little Iowa town. I met Valerie when she was like the coolest person I’d ever seen in this corner of the state. She was waiting tables and we talked about photography and pretty tattoos. We became friends and it turns out she had just moved from California and she and her hubby of just a few months were looking for a church community. They got connected with us and now they’re awesome youth volunteers and worship musicians at our church.

But God wasn’t done with them yet. He was moving in their hearts, and one night over dinner they told us they felt God was moving them to do some mission work this year before Zach graduates college. Now, they’re prepping to spend two months serving abandoned and under-resourced children without families in Burkina Faso, a small but heavily populated country in West Africa. (Near Nigeria, where Joseph was born!) Valerie + Zach are young newlyweds and they’re working to get the funds together to make this mission trip a reality.

I asked Valerie to share her story and her heart, as well as some of the creative ways they’re raising support.

Tell us a little about yourself! I’m a photographer and I just enjoy meeting new people and hearing their stories. I’m barely starting — and have so much more to learn! My dream job would be a traveling wedding/lifestyle photographer, working in ministry at our home church, and get to be a stay-at-home mom. Haha.

Zach is in his senior year at Northwestern and he’s majoring in elementary education with an endorsement in English as a second language. He wants to teach 5th graders and would love to be in a class full of foreign exchange students! He also wants to teach little league baseball and work in ministry at a home church as well. We are currently invested at our home church at the moment at Dover Alliance Church, where we do worship, volunteer with high school and college ministry and we LOVE it. We probably want to go back to California since it is our home but we’re willing to go wherever God wants us to go.

When did you know God was leading you guys to Burkina? Before we got married, I prayed for a husband that would be willing to do missionary work if God called us to do that, so it was amazing to get to know Zach and find out that he worked at summer camps as a leader and has had a heart to spread love to others in other places. I was raised doing missionary work in Brazil, Peru, and Mexico. We prayed for a long time and almost did YWAM but God switched our plans to Envision, a mission organization for millennials in the Christian & Missionary Alliance denomination.

Where will you be serving? We will be in a teeny town called Yako in Burkina Faso in Western Africa. The country has 8 million people and only 14% claim to be Christians. The rest are Islamic.

What will you do be doing? We’ll be staying at an orphanage called Sheltering Wings, where they have children from newborns all the way to 22 years old. We will basically be spending lots of time loving on all of these kids and teaching them about God’s love. There’s a possibility of working with a local church’s youth group, too. Zach’s education is in ESL, and he will be very equipped to connect and teach these kids. Envision puts it this way: Even in difficult circumstances, God is working in Burkina Faso. Local churches across the country are meeting needs and providing hope for many Burkinabe people. National missionaries and pastors are being raised up and trained to effectively spread the Gospel to their neighbors. Wells are being drilled, schools are being built, churches are being planted, children are experiencing love, relationships are being developed, the hungry are being fed, the sick are being healed, and the Gospel of Jesus Christ is being preached.

How long will you be there? We will be there October-November 2014. We wish we could stay longer but Zach has student teaching coming up!

How can we pray for you? We need prayers for financial stability. Please pray that God will use us in any way He needs to. We’re praying for our spirits to be willing and compassionate for a community we’ve never been in before.

What ways can we support you financially? We have a secure online account if anyone feels led to donate. If you go to this link, type “ENV- Zach and Valerie Metz” in the “Give to International Workers and Special Projects” option. You’ll get a tax receipt for your donated funds. I am also selling some of my closet items (the dress below is just one item for sale!) and making floral crowns to sell as well ($10-15 in all sizes, including infant and kids!). We are also thinking of putting our musical talents to do good and have an open concert so that’ll be fun!

10150078_10202958873786233_260784953_n

How can we follow your journey? You can contact our personal Facebook accounts (Zachary Metz and Valerie Metz) or our Facebook page, Love to Burkina. If you want to hear about the orphanage we’re staying at during our trip, you can follow along here.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Pin It on Pinterest