Hi, I'm Kayla.

I’m happy you’re here. I’ll go first: I’m a full-time journalist turned work-at-home writer. I’m hitched to a shaggy-haired pastor and we’re smitten with two wild + crazy boys: Joseph (4) and Asher (1). I drink strong coffee, I like pretty things, and I believe there’s beauty in the broken.

I hope this little space will encourage you to find worth and live a story worth sharing.

Let's do this.

What is Many Sparrows?

This little corner of the Internet aims to encourage women, spurring them on to find worth and live a story worth sharing.

God tells us He cares about the little things — even down to a teeny, tiny sparrow. And if He cares about a little bird, how much more does He care about us — who are worth far more than many sparrows? Let’s dwell in the truth that He loves us with an arms-stretched-out kind love. Let’s rest easy, knowing we’re valued, loved, and worth more than we can even fathom.

I’m a person who’s blemished and blessed. All good things in my life flow from Jesus. My mission is to reflect his generous, grace-filled love with all my heart, soul, and mind. I’m passionate about shedding religious cliches and living an authentic, Kingdom life. Sometimes I get frustrated and often times I fail. I’m a work in progress.

Find Your Worth & Live a Story Worth Telling

Faith

My heart is to use this corner of the Internet to make much of Jesus. To use my words to reflect the creator of all things who gives extravagant grace, who radiates beauty and light in a very dark world.

Style

I’m a mama of two little boys, and sometimes I just need a space to talk about things like shift dresses and wedge booties and dry shampoo. Let’s share our secrets, shall we?

Motherhood

Motherhood is messy. My hope is that my words + stories can be an encouragement to you in your parenting journey.

Happy Thoughts

Couldn’t this world use a little more joy? Whether I’m recounting a sweet story or sharing a book review, maybe these little posts will bring some happiness your way.

honest co. giveaway (perfect for new mamas + expecting moms!)

Honest Co. giveaway and review for new moms and expecting moms. // Many Sparrows Blog

I’m in that stage in life where I’m attending a lot of baby showers. Many of my sweet friends are expecting through pregnancy and adoption and I’m just so thrilled for them! New life is certainly something to celebrate.

One baby care brand I love giving new mamas (whether she’s celebrating her first or fifth) is Honest Co. (Jessica Alba’s adorably branded company). The items are natural, safe, and smell so good. (I just doused our kitchen with the multi-surface cleaner. It’s infused with grapefruit essential oils, so I mean, YES.)

Honest Co. giveaway and review for new moms and expecting moms. // Many Sparrows Blog

Since I’m already a fan of the company, I was happy to join forces with Susana at Hurray, I’m a Mommy (who is a new blogger and has the most adorable little daughter, ever) for an Honest Co. bundle giveaway for all of you ladies out there. I really wish I could win, because friends, this stuff is good.

The Honest Co. New Mama Giveaway includes:

So good, right? Susana rounded up a few like-minded writers + bloggers for the giveaway, and I’m so thrilled to be joining this crew of lovely ladies.

Honest Co. Giveaway

Here’s a bit about the other lovely ladies you see in that photo:

  • Evi from Eyeliner and Erasers promotes a sense of empowerment and self confidence through posts about beauty, style, professionalism, motherhood, and wellness.
  •  

    Susannah from Simple Moments Stick writes from Portland, where she’s a wife to a seminary grad and mama to a little guy named Caleb. She loves encouraging women.

  • Jen from The Jen Weaver centers around daily adventures in life and faith. A new mom herself, she’s starting an exciting new series called “freshly minted” where she shares weekly refreshMINT for moms and marriages.
  •  

    Terrence from Girl Repurposed is a wife and mom living in Dallas, where her husband is studying at Dallas Theological Seminary. She’s an Ivy-league grad who is following the call to be a writer and full-time mama.

We’ve made it so easy to win, so enter below.

This is a fun one, you guys! (And there might just be a fun Instagram-only giveaway in the works as well!)

Good luck, friends! xo

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The Honest Company

Disclaimer: Affiliate links used when applicable.

Parenthood was an amazing TV series. Period.

Parenthood

On Thursday nights, I’d shuffle two little boys into their PJs, perform more than one dramatic reading of “One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish,” and whisper goodnight prayers. Then, I’d tuck away under a blanket of my own, grabbing the remote and keeping tissues in sight.

Thursdays were for “Parenthood” — the show that you inevitably Facebook statuses waxing poetic about.

This week, the series closed up shop for good, and I’ve been thinking about why I connected with the network drama so much. My husband is unabashed in his claims that the show is terrible. (He also has a knack for hyperbole and likes watching “Flea Market Flip”. So, yeah.)

But “Parenthood” wasn’t terrible. In fact, it was really good — the character development, the cohesive writing, the moving performances, the artful shots — all of it.

Parenthood

So here’s what made “Parenthood” so great:

The writers dealt with authentic, real-life issues in a way that didn’t make the plots seem over-dramatic or over-done. It was sentimental without being syrupy, realistic without being rigid.

The hour-long drama was so good because it cultivated empathy. So often, it’s the fiction books I read that sow compassion and understanding into my heart. I suddenly viewed cancer as something raw and real. I saw the conversations and the struggles of teenagers wrestling with abortion. I watched a soldier wrestle with PTSD and saw the addiction many struggle with in a new light. I heard families ask authentic questions about God. Through the TV, I saw it all — relationships reconciled, dreams dashed, and hurts healed.

I began to see bits of myself, and other people I love, in so many of the characters. When Julia wrestled with her identity when she decided to stay home, I understood. When Kristina advocated for her special needs son in countless IEP meetings, I got it. When Crosby and Jasmine wrestled with race, I was held captive.

Parenthood series review.  Series finale.

I watched women find their brave and do hard things. I saw them pursue passions, start businesses, love without agenda, create with their hands and their hearts and their minds and their souls. I saw women support their husbands and spur them on to be the men they were made to be. I saw mothers advocate for their children and stand on the front lines for them, even when they could barely stand. They were wild and free women and yet still women who struggled to get carseats in the car and make sure the bills were paid. Women who wrestled with being a wife and a mom and a professional. Women who came to motherhood in different ways in different stages of life. Women who burned the pancakes and doubted and feared just like all of us.

“Parenthood” allowed me to see shades of gray in an ever-polarizing black-or-white world.

It weaved together multiple stories with the common thread of family.

A family that didn’t always look alike. A family that wasn’t always biological. A family that didn’t always agree.

But they were a group of people that, through whatever they were navigating, could come together at the table. They had grace for each other, welcoming each other into an intimate life where you find yourself laughing and crying in the same sentence.

Parenthood series review.  Series finale.Parenthood series review.  Series finale.

I think we need to see real. And in so many ways, the fictional Braverman clan was more authentic and transparent than many real families we know. And I think that’s why the show resonated with so many of us.

“Life is short, you cannot know how impossibly fast it goes by. So just enjoy this baby. Cherish this time. Cherish every minute of it,” Camille Braverman. (Yes, I just quoted her like she is a real person. This is where I’m at and I’m okay with that.)

“Parenthood” hit chord with so many of us because it was simply a show about what it is to be human.

What it is to go through the hard stuff and come out on the other side, maybe with a few bruises, but always with a stronger heart.

I’ve been thinking about a scene from this season. Zeek and Camille drive back to the big, two-story home where they raised their family. Zeek remembers that he had hidden an autographed baseball in the rafters of the barn (to protect it from the two young sons who were fighting for it). The aging grandparents head back “home”, planning to ask the new owners if they could take a look and retrieve the ball. The car pulls up to the house, now inhabited with a new family. Little boys are running around the yard, in some sort of epic battle. A little girl plays on the swing set, and a golden retriever sleeps in the shade. They watch as a mom, clearly pregnant, open the front door and shouts something to her little tribe.

And in that moment Zeek, a character who has transformed in the course of the series from a gruff father to a soft-hearted man, decides to keep it there for good. “They’re gonna think they found the hidden treasure,” he says. “It’s gonna be the best day of their lives.”

Parenthood

And the finale? It was touching and beautiful and provided closure — everything a series ending should be. The last six minutes have no dialogue — just glimpses of what the future holds for each member of the Braverman family. And, because of course, it’s set to a beautiful acoustic cover of Bob Dylan’s “Forever Young” — performed by Iron & Wine.

Parenthood

May God bless and keep you always
May your wishes all come true
May you always do for others
And let others do for you
May you build a ladder to the stars
And climb on every rung
May you stay forever young
Forever young, forever young
May you stay forever young.

May you grow up to be righteous
May you grow up to be true
May you always know the truth
And see the lights surrounding you
May you always be courageous
Stand upright and be strong
May you stay forever young
Forever young, forever young
May you stay forever young.

May your hands always be busy
May your feet always be swift
May you have a strong foundation
When the winds of changes shift
May your heart always be joyful
And may your song always be sung
May you stay forever young
Forever young, forever young
May you stay forever young.

Did you watch “Parenthood”, too? What characters or episodes resonated most with you?

Photos via NBC

believe

Believe, NIV, a Bible designed to help Christians lead a more Christ-like life. A follow up to Zondervan’s popular, The Story, Believe, NIV is designed as an easy-to-follow topical abridgment of the best-selling NIV Bible, focusing on the 30 key beliefs, practices and virtues intended to help readers uncover the core truths of the Christian faith and apply them to their lives.

What do we believe? Like, what do we really believe?

I think I believe a lot of good things about God. But sometimes I wonder — where did these good things come from? Have I formed my view of who God is based on my circumstances? My culture?

Do I hold a set of beliefs because I’ve created my God in my image?

We live more vibrantly when we we lay down our preconceived notions of who he is. We come to the table of life abundant when we realize we’re on this big, giant journey of belief.

Zondervan sent me an advance copy of Believe, NIV, a Bible designed to help Christians wade through the muck and mire to see God’s truth through a fresh lens. A follow up to the popular, The Story, Believe, NIV is designed as an easy-to-follow abridgment of the NIV Bible. (They also have a giveaway copy for one of you! Enter at the end of the post.)

Believe, NIV, a Bible designed to help Christians lead a more Christ-like life. A follow up to Zondervan’s popular, The Story, Believe, NIV is designed as an easy-to-follow topical abridgment of the best-selling NIV Bible, focusing on the 30 key beliefs, practices and virtues intended to help readers uncover the core truths of the Christian faith and apply them to their lives.

I’ve never seen anything like Believe, NIV, and I thought it’d be really interesting to get a pastor’s perspective. So, I asked Jonny (Remember when he graduated with a Master’s in Christian Thought?) to share his thoughts on Believe, NIV.

Here’s what he had to say:

What it is: Believe, NIV is a collection of scripture passages (with intermittent editorial comments, helpfully made in italics to differentiate them) that have been curated and organized to move a Christian through three stages:

  • What we believe (the basic doctrines of the Church)
  • What we should do (the practices of the faith)
  • What we are becoming (this section is built around the fruits of the Spirit).

In a pleasant twist, Believe completely ditches chapter and verse numbers, which allows the reader to move through passages as a whole which helps the reader lose themselves in the story. So often we see scripture as being segmented and divided, and this fresh (or rather, ancient) approach moves the reader away from segmented thinking and toward a more holistic understanding of the Bible.

What I liked: Believe, NIV makes the Bible more accessible than it often seems to be. Without chapters and verses, passages flow in a way that is more natural and helpful to readers who are seeking big ideas rather than tiny details. Overall, it’s a helpful book with a very natural progression that could help Christians to read and understand their Bibles in new and better ways.

What I’m hesitant of: By their very nature, editorial choices about what passages to use and how are ultimately interpretational and theological decisions. Readers should approach Believe, NIV with this fact in mind, recognizing that the organization of the book is putting forward a particular interpretation of scripture, not necessarily the only or even most correct interpretation. I don’t have any specific issues with the editorial decisions in mind as I make this caveat, but it is important for readers to understand nonetheless.

Who might like it: While Believe, NIV is a book that could be helpful for any Christian, whether they’ve spent their whole life in the Church or have recently converted, it is probably those Christians who haven’t spent a ton of time in Scripture who could most benefit from the layout and editorial choices made in Believe, NIV. While the Bible as a whole can be intimidating, Believe, NIV breaks the major themes and story of scripture into easily understandable and consumable portions.

A companion book, Think, Act, Be Like Jesus released jointly with Believe, NIV this month. Written by Randy Frazee with Robert Noland, it explains how to grow as a follower of Christ and become more like Him in our thinking, actions and character. It can be read either in conjunction with Believe or separately as an individual study.

Does this Bible/book combo call out to you? Or does it sound like a good fit for someone you love? January is a great month to start fresh, and it’s not too late to start a resolution to spend more time in Scripture. Zondervan let me know that they would love to send a copy to a Many Sparrows reader — how sweet is that?

Let’s make it easy to enter.

Comment why you’d like to receive a copy in the mail. Want an extra entry? Follow me on Instagram. I’ll draw a random winner next week! xo

Disclaimer: Affiliate links used when applicable.

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hi, i’m kayla

I'm a full-time journalist turned work-at-home editor. I'm hitched to a shaggy-haired pastor and we're smitten with two wild + crazy boys: Joseph (4) and Asher (1). I drink strong coffee, I like pretty things, and I believe there's beauty in the broken. I hope this little space will encourage you to find worth and live a story worth sharing. Join me?

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My favorite part about writing is connecting with you! Whoever you are, wherever you are, you have a story worth sharing. Let’s talk.

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